everything is everything

Twenty-three. Guitar slinger and songwriter for Canary. Sports enthusiast. Natural optimist and lover of life.

Probably the best 14 minutes you’ll spend all day.

Twenty-three

July 24, 2013

It’s hard to believe I’m no longer 22.

Several people asked me how old I feel today.  I don’t feel 23.  I feel younger now than I did when I turned 22.  On my 22nd birthday, I had Canary rehearsal.  We had our first show with Naomi the following day.  I wasn’t consciously stressed, but looking back there was some stress.  There had to be.  I was still heartbroken and trying to move forward while patching up the pain.

Eventually we got there.  We got real close to some really cool things.  Then Naomi quit.  Alex and I were very angry.  I was really angry.  I’m not an angry person and that took its toll on me big time.  Then Brooke came along and a lot of it went away.  Between Brooke and our road trip to SXSW, March was as awesome as February was terrible.

So now I’ve turned a new leaf, let go of a lot of anger, and feel a lot better.  I untied myself in a lot of ways in the past year.  Especially recently.  I used to be so focused on getting it right the first time.  Well, I clearly didn’t do that so it’s time to embrace the mess and stop longing for what I can’t have because I don’t have a band of high school buddies.  It’s a different world, and in order to succeed, I have to do different things.

And I’m okay with that.

I think 23 is going to work out just fine.

Bruce Springsteen

May 31, 2013 2:07AM

I love Bruce Springsteen more than life itself.

If I’m exaggerating, I’m not exaggerating much.

Bruce has been at the heart of my musical adventures since I discovered him in earnest when I was 15. When people asked me what I wanted to do with my life or what I wanted out of life I said I wanted to be Bruce Springsteen.

One friend said, “Wow. Most people say they want money or fame, but you have it narrowed down to one person. That’s impressive.”

That notion of narrowing down hasn’t left. My desire to be Bruce Springsteen - which at that point was nothing shy of literal - has diminished. Only due to physical limitations in the fact that he already exists.

And thank GOD he does exist.

What can I write about Bruce that hasn’t already been written?

I play a butterscotch blonde Telecaster for two very specific reasons: Keith Richards and Bruce Springsteen.

I’m slowly coming full circle with my everlasting love of Bruce Springsteen. When I first started really listening to Bruce, I really wanted to be him. I wanted to sing and write and play my own songs. I quickly learned that Bruce and I grew up in incredibly different environments and times and my songs wouldn’t sound quite like his because of those, for better or worse.

But I learned that while my voice (musically and otherwise) will never sound quite like Bruce, there are a number of other parts of him that I can embody and learn from. His passion, his work ethic, his social conscience, his ambition, his loyalty, his level of awareness, and how much he believes in his songs and how important his fans are to him.

And he knows how important he is to his fans.

I had forgotten about this until someone I know hadn’t seen it.  I hadn’t seen this one.  Pure.  Gold.

I had forgotten about this until someone I know hadn’t seen it.  I hadn’t seen this one.  Pure.  Gold.

(Source: mckaylaisnotimpressed)


Here are some interesting facts about him, though:
He basically saved public television. In 1969 the government wanted to cut public television funds. Mister Rogers then went to Washington where he gave an amazing merely six minute speech. By the end of the speech not only did he charm the hostile Senators, he got them to double the budget they would have initially cut down. The whole thing can be found on youtube, a video called “Mister Rogers defending PBS to the US Senate.”
“Certain fundamentalist preachers hated him because, apparently not getting the “kindest man who ever lived” memo, they would ask him to denounce homosexuals. Mr. Rogers’s response? He’d pat the target on the shoulder and say, “God loves you just as you are.” Rogers even belonged to a “More Light” congregation in Pittsburgh, a part of the Presbyterian Church dedicated to welcoming LGBT persons to full participation in the church.”
According to a TV Guide piece on him, Fred Rogers drove a plain old Impala for years. One day, however, the car was stolen from the street near the TV station. When Rogers filed a police report, the story was picked up by every newspaper, radio and media outlet around town. Amazingly, within 48 hours the car was left in the exact spot where it was taken from, with an apology on the dashboard. It read, “If we’d known it was yours, we never would have taken it.”
Once, on a fancy trip up to a PBS exec’s house, he heard the limo driver was going to wait outside for 2 hours, so he insisted the driver come in and join them (which flustered the host). On the way back, Rogers sat up front, and when he learned that they were passing the driver’s home on the way, he asked if they could stop in to meet his family. According to the driver, it was one of the best nights of his life—the house supposedly lit up when Rogers arrived, and he played jazz piano and bantered with them late into the night. Further, like with the reporters, Rogers sent him notes and kept in touch with the driver for the rest of his life.

Such. A. BAMF.

Here are some interesting facts about him, though:

  • He basically saved public television. In 1969 the government wanted to cut public television funds. Mister Rogers then went to Washington where he gave an amazing merely six minute speech. By the end of the speech not only did he charm the hostile Senators, he got them to double the budget they would have initially cut down. The whole thing can be found on youtube, a video called “Mister Rogers defending PBS to the US Senate.”
  • “Certain fundamentalist preachers hated him because, apparently not getting the “kindest man who ever lived” memo, they would ask him to denounce homosexuals. Mr. Rogers’s response? He’d pat the target on the shoulder and say, “God loves you just as you are.” Rogers even belonged to a “More Light” congregation in Pittsburgh, a part of the Presbyterian Church dedicated to welcoming LGBT persons to full participation in the church.”
  • According to a TV Guide piece on him, Fred Rogers drove a plain old Impala for years. One day, however, the car was stolen from the street near the TV station. When Rogers filed a police report, the story was picked up by every newspaper, radio and media outlet around town. Amazingly, within 48 hours the car was left in the exact spot where it was taken from, with an apology on the dashboard. It read, “If we’d known it was yours, we never would have taken it.”
  • Once, on a fancy trip up to a PBS exec’s house, he heard the limo driver was going to wait outside for 2 hours, so he insisted the driver come in and join them (which flustered the host). On the way back, Rogers sat up front, and when he learned that they were passing the driver’s home on the way, he asked if they could stop in to meet his family. According to the driver, it was one of the best nights of his life—the house supposedly lit up when Rogers arrived, and he played jazz piano and bantered with them late into the night. Further, like with the reporters, Rogers sent him notes and kept in touch with the driver for the rest of his life.

Such. A. BAMF.

(Source: junglelauren, via dandelionchild)

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